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Archive for the ‘Ivo Jima Maps’ Category

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

– Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 9 April- 30 June 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Map of 9 April- 30 June 1945

– Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Map of 9 April- 30 June 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Map of the Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

– Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

Iwo Jima Maps, WW II

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Part of the images are used with the kind permission from the History Department at the
United States Military Academy

Additional reading : Garand, George W. and Truman R. Strobridge. History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II Volume IV: Western Pacific Operations

See also: IwoJima.com: A site dedicated to Iwo Jima and the famous battle

See also: General Maps About the Far East and the Pacific During The WW II
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The Battle of Iwo Jima (February 19, 1945 – March 26, 1945) was the United States capture of the island of Iwo Jima from Japan, producing some of the fiercest fighting in the Pacific Campaign of World War II.
The Japanese positions on the island were heavily fortified, with vast bunkers, hidden artillery, and 18 kilometers (11 mi) of tunnels.The battle was the first American attack on the Japanese Home Islands and the Imperial soldiers defended their positions tenaciously. Of the 21,000 Japanese soldiers present at the beginning of the battle, over 20,000 were killed and only 216 taken prisoner. The U.S. invasion, known as Operation Detachment, was charged with the mission of capturing the airfields on Iwo Jima.
The battle was immortalized by Joe Rosenthal’s photograph of the raising of the U.S. flag atop the 166 meter (546 ft) Mount Suribachi by five Marines and one Navy Corpsman. The photograph records the second flag-raising on the mountain, which took place on the fifth day of the 35-day battle. The picture became the iconic image of the battle and has been heavily reproduced.
Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, a photo by Joe Rosenthal – Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, a photo by Joe Rosenthal

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