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The thoughts and hopes of all America—indeed of all the civilized world—are centered tonight on the battleship Missouri. There on that small piece of American soil anchored in Tokyo Harbor the Japanese have just officially laid down their arms. They have signed terms of unconditional surrender.

Four years ago, the thoughts and fears of the whole civilized world were centered on another piece of American soil—Pearl Harbor. The mighty threat to civilization which began there is now laid at rest. It was a long road to Tokyo—and a bloody one.

We shall not forget Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese militarists will not forget the U.S.S. Missouri.

The evil done by the Japanese war lords can never be repaired or forgotten. But their power to destroy and kill has been taken from them. Their armies and what is left of their Navy are now impotent.

(more…)

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Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

– Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 9 April- 30 June 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Map of 9 April- 30 June 1945

– Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Map of 9 April- 30 June 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Map of the Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

– Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

Iwo Jima Maps, WW II

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more about “Iwo Jima Maps, WW II“, posted with vodpod

 

Part of the images are used with the kind permission from the History Department at the
United States Military Academy

Additional reading : Garand, George W. and Truman R. Strobridge. History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II Volume IV: Western Pacific Operations

See also: IwoJima.com: A site dedicated to Iwo Jima and the famous battle

See also: General Maps About the Far East and the Pacific During The WW II
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The Battle of Iwo Jima (February 19, 1945 – March 26, 1945) was the United States capture of the island of Iwo Jima from Japan, producing some of the fiercest fighting in the Pacific Campaign of World War II.
The Japanese positions on the island were heavily fortified, with vast bunkers, hidden artillery, and 18 kilometers (11 mi) of tunnels.The battle was the first American attack on the Japanese Home Islands and the Imperial soldiers defended their positions tenaciously. Of the 21,000 Japanese soldiers present at the beginning of the battle, over 20,000 were killed and only 216 taken prisoner. The U.S. invasion, known as Operation Detachment, was charged with the mission of capturing the airfields on Iwo Jima.
The battle was immortalized by Joe Rosenthal’s photograph of the raising of the U.S. flag atop the 166 meter (546 ft) Mount Suribachi by five Marines and one Navy Corpsman. The photograph records the second flag-raising on the mountain, which took place on the fifth day of the 35-day battle. The picture became the iconic image of the battle and has been heavily reproduced.
Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, a photo by Joe Rosenthal – Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, a photo by Joe Rosenthal

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German-Japanese Agreement and Supplementary Protocol, Signed at Berlin, November 25, 1936
Translation, in Department of State, Foreign Relations of the United States: Japan, 1931-1941, II, 153

Agreement Guarding Against the Communistic International

The Imperial Government of Japan and the Government of Germany,

In cognizance of the fact that the object of the Communistic International (the so-called Komintern) is the disintegration of, and the commission of violence against, existing States by the exercise of all means at its command,

Believing that the toleration of interference by the Communistic International in the internal affairs of nations not only endangers their internal peace and social welfare, but threatens the general peace of the world,

Desiring to co-operate for defense against communistic disintegration, have agreed as follows.

Article I

The High Contracting States agree that they will mutually keep each other informed concerning the activities of the Communistic International, will confer upon the necessary measure of defense, and will carry out such measures in close co-operation.

Article II

The High Contracting States will jointly invite third States whose internal peace is menaced by the disintegrating work of the Communistic International, to adopt defensive measures in the spirit of the present Agreement or to participate in the present Agreement.

Article III

The Japanese and German texts are each valid as the original text of this Agreement. The Agreement shall come into force on the day of its signature and shall remain in force for the term of five years. The High Contracting States will, in a reasonable time before the expiration of the said term, come to an understanding upon the further manner of their co-operation.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorized by their respective Governments, have affixed hereto their seals and signatures.

Done in duplicate at Berlin, November 25th, 11th year of Showa, corresponding to November 25th, 1936.

Viscount Kintomo Mushakoji
Imperial Japanese Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary

Joachim von Ribbentrop German Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary

Source: The Avalon Project at Yale Law School

See also: The Pact of Steel – the Pact of Friendship and Alliance between Germany and Italy, May 22, 1939

See also: Anti-Comintern Pact, November 25, 1936

See also: Three-Power Pact Between Germany, Italy, and Japan, Signed at Berlin, September 27, 1940

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Three-Power Pact Between Germany, Italy, and Japan, Signed at Berlin, September 27, 1940

The governments of Germany, Italy and Japan, considering it as a condition precedent of any lasting peace that all nations of the world be given each its own proper place, have decided to stand by and co-operate with one another in regard to their efforts in greater East Asia and regions of Europe respectively wherein it is their prime purpose to establish and maintain a new order of things calculated to promote the mutual prosperity and welfare of the peoples concerned.

Furthermore, it is the desire of the three governments to extend co-operation to such nations in other spheres of the world as may be inclined to put forth endeavours along lines similar to their own, in order that their ultimate aspirations for world peace may thus be realized.

Accordingly, the governments of Germany, Italy and Japan have agreed as follows:

ARTICLE ONE
Japan recognizes and respects the leadership of Germany and Italy in establishment of a new order in Europe.

ARTICLE TWO
Germany and Italy recognize and respect the leadership of Japan in the establishment of a new order in greater East Asia.

ARTICLE THREE
Germany, Italy and Japan agree to co-operate in their efforts on aforesaid lines. They further undertake to assist one another with all political, economic and military means when one of the three contracting powers is attacked by a power at present not involved in the European war or in the Chinese-Japanese conflict.

ARTICLE FOUR
With the view to implementing the present pact, joint technical commissions, members which are to be appointed by the respective governments of Germany, Italy and Japan will meet without delay.

ARTICLE FIVE
Germany, Italy and Japan affirm that the aforesaid terms do not in any way affect the political status which exists at present as between each of the three contracting powers and Soviet Russia.(1)

ARTICLE SIX
The present pact shall come into effect immediately upon signature and shall remain in force 10 years from the date of its coming into force. At the proper time before expiration of said term, the high contracting parties shall at the request of any of them enter into negotiations for its renewal.

In faith whereof, the undersigned duly authorized by their respective governments have signed this pact and have affixed hereto their signatures.

Done in triplicate at Berlin, the 27th day of September, 1940, in the 19th year of the fascist era, corresponding to the 27th day of the ninth month of the 15th year of Showa (the reign of Emperor Hirohito).

See also: Anti-Comintern Pact, November 25, 1936

See also: Treaty of Nonaggression Between Germany and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Source: The Avalon Project at Yale Law School

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Imperial Powers in the Far East, 1939

Allied Strategic Concept, Map of 1943

Allied Theater Organization Map, 2 July 1942

Allied Theater Organization Map, 30 March – 6 August 1942

Map of the Areas Under Allied and Japanese Control, August 1945

Bombing of Japanese Cities Maps

China, Map of 1941 Map about the Imperial Powers in the Far East, 1939

Plans and Forces at the Beginning of the War, 1941

Plans and Forces at the Beginning of the War, December 1941

Summary of Allied Campaigns, February 1945

The Far East and the Pacific, 1941

All the images are used with the kind permission from the History Department at the United States Military Academy

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Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact April 13, 1941

PACT OF NEUTRALITY BETWEEN UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS AND JAPAN
The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, guided by a desire to strengthen peaceful and friendly relations between the two countries, have decided to conclude a pact on neutrality, for which purpose they have appointed as their Representatives:

The Presidum of the Supreme Soviet of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics –

Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov,
Chairman of the Council of People’s Commissars
and People’s Commissar of Foreign Affairs of
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics;

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan –

Yosuke Matsuoka,
Minister of Foreign Affairs, Jusanmin,
Cavalier of the Order of the Sacred
Treasure of the First Class, and

Yoshitsugu Tatekawa,
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics,
Lieutenant General, Jusanmin, Cavalier of the
Order of the Rising Sun of the First Class and
the Order of the Golden Kite of the Fourth Class,

who, after an exchange of their credentials, which were found in due and proper form, have agreed on the following:

ARTICLE ONE
Both Contracting Parties undertake to maintain peaceful and friendly relations between them and mutually respect the territorial integrity and inviolability of the other Contracting Party.

ARTICLE TWO
Should one of the Contracting Parties become the object of hostilities on the part of one or several third powers, the other Contracting Party will observe neutrality throughout the duration of the conflict.

ARTICLE THREE
The present Pact comes into force from the day of its ratification by both Contracting Parties and remains valid for five years. In case neither of the Contracting Parties denounces the Pact one year before the expiration of the term, it will be considered automatically prolonged for the next five years.

ARTICLE FOUR
The present Pact is subject to ratification as soon as possible. The instruments of ratification shall be exchanged in Tokyo, also as soon as possible.

In confirmation whereof the above-named Representatives have signed the present Pact in two copies, drawn up in the Russian and Japanese languages, and affixed thereto their seals.

Done in Moscow on April 13, 1941, which corresponds to the 13th day of the fourth month of the 16th year of Showa.

V. MOLOTOV
YOSUKE MATSUOKA
YOSHITSUGU TATEKAWA
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See also: Soviet Declaration of War on Japan – Aug., 8, 1945

Courtesy of The Avalon Project at Yale Law School, http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/avalon.htm

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Soviet Declaration of War on Japan
London, Aug., 8, 1945 – Foreign Commissar Molotoff’s (sic) announcement of the declaration of war, as broadcast by Moscow, follows:

On Aug. 8, People’s Commissar for Foreign Affairs of the U.S.S.R. Molotoff received the Japanese Ambassador, Mr. Sato, and gave him, on behalf of the Soviet Government, the following for transmission to the Japanese Government:

“After the defeat and capitulation of Hitlerite Germany, Japan became the only great power that still stood for the continuation of the war.

“The demand of the three powers, the United States, Great Britain and China, on July 26 for the unconditional surrender of the Japanese armed forces was rejected by Japan, and thus the proposal of the Japanese Government to the Soviet Union on mediation in the war in the Far East loses all basis.

“Taking into consideration the refusal of Japan to capitulate, the Allies submitted to the Soviet Government a proposal to join the war against Japanese aggression and thus shorten the duration of the war, reduce the number of victims and facilitate the speedy restoration of universal peace.

“Loyal to its Allied duty, the Soviet Government has accepted the proposals of the Allies and has joined in the declaration of the Allied powers of July 26.

“The Soviet Government considers that this policy is the only means able to bring peace nearer, free the people from further sacrifice and suffering and give the Japanese people the possibility of avoiding the dangers and destruction suffered by Germany after her refusal to capitulate unconditionally.

“In view of the above, the Soviet Government declares that from tomorrow, that is from Aug. 9, the Soviet Government will consider itself to be at war with Japan.”
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See also: Congressional Declaration of War on Japan – December 8, 1941

See also: Harry S. Truman’s Announcement Of the Dropping Of An Atomic Bomb On Hiroshima, August 6, 1945

Courtesy of The Avalon Project at Yale Law School, http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/

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