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Archive for the ‘WW II – Second World War’ Category

The Tunisia Campaign – November 17, 1942 – May 13, 1943 – (also known as the Battle of Tunisia) was a series of World War II battles that took place in Tunisia in the North African Campaign of World War II, between Axis and Allied forces. The Allies consisted primarily of American, British Imperial Forces and the French Army. The battle opened with initial success by the German and Italian forces, but the massive supply and numerical superiority of the Allies led to the Axis’ complete defeat. Over 230,000 German and Italian troops were taken as prisoners of war, including most of the Afrika Korps.

 

 

Axis Initiative, Situation 14 February 1943

Axis Initiative, Situation 14 February 1943

Axis Initiative, Situation 14 February 1943

 

Campaign In Northwest Africa, The Battle Of Kasserine Pass 14-22 February1942

Campaign In Northwest Africa, The Battle Of Kasserine Pass 14-22 February1942

Map of the Campaign In Northwest Africa, The Battle Of Kasserine Pass 14-22 February1942

 

North Africa, The Allied Invasion, 8 November 1942

North Africa, The Allied Invasion, 8 November 1942

North Africa, Mao of The Allied Invasion, 8 November 1942

 

Northwest Africa 1942-1943

Northwest Africa 1942-1943

Mao of Northwest Africa 1942-1943

 

Pursuit To Tunisia, November 1942-February 1943

Pursuit To Tunisia, November 1942-February 1943

Map of The Pursuit To Tunisia, November 1942-February 1943

Map of The battles at Kasserine Pass and Sbiba gap

 

The Race For Tunis, 11-17 November 1942

The Race For Tunis, 11-17 November 1942

Map of The Race For Tunis, 11-17 November 1942

 

Tunisia, Easten Task Force, 25 Nov-10 Dec 1942

Tunisia, Easten Task Force, 25 Nov-10 Dec 1942

Tunisia, Easten Task Force, Map of 25 Nov-10 Dec 1942

 

Tunisia, Final Allied Offensive 22 April-3 May 1943

Tunisia, Final Allied Offensive 22 April-3 May 1943

Tunisia, Map of The Final Allied Offensive 22 April-3 May 1943

 

Tunisia, Situation 22 April 1943

Tunisia, Situation 22 April 1943

Tunisia, Situation 22 April 1943

 

Tunisia, Southern Operations, 30 Jan -10 April

Tunisia, Southern Operations, 30 Jan -10 April

Map of Tunisia, Southern Operations, 30 Jan -10 April

 

Tunisia, Southern Operations, 30 Jan -10 April

Tunisia, Southern Operations, 30 Jan -10 April

Tunisia, Southern Operations, Map of 30 Jan -10 April

 

Tunisia, Taking the Bridgehead, 20 April - 13 May 1943

Tunisia, Taking the Bridgehead, 20 April - 13 May 1943

Tunisia, Taking the Bridgehead, Map of 20 April – 13 May 1943

 

Some of the maps are used with the kind permisson of the United States Military Academy at West Point
Other maps published on Public Domain – U.S. Army Center Of Military History

Recommended reading: Tunisia, 17 November 1942-13 May 1943 – brochure by the U.S. Army Center Of Military History

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Map of the Campaign In Poland, 1 – 14 September 1939

 

Map of the Campaign In Poland, 15-22 September 1939

Campaign In Poland, Deployment Of The Wehrmacht, 1 September 1939

Campaign In Poland, Disposition Of Oposing Forces, 31 August 1939

Campaign In Poland, Industry and Communications,1939

 

Used with the kind permission of the United States Military Academy – West Point

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The Invasion of Poland (1939) precipitated World War II. It was carried out by Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, and a small German-allied Slovak contingent. In Poland the invasion is also known as “the September Campaign” (“Kampania wrześniowa”) or “the 1939 Defensive War” (“Wojna obronna 1939 roku”). In Germany it is sometimes referred to as “the Poland Campaign” (“Polenfeldzug”) or “the Polish-German War of 1939”. For the German General Staff, it was codenamed “Fall Weiss,” or “Case White”.
The invasion of Poland marked the start of World War II in Europe, as Poland’s western allies, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand,[6] declared war on Germany on 3 September, soon followed by France, South Africa and Canada, among others. The invasion began on 1 September 1939, one week after the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, and ended 6 October 1939, with Germany and the Soviet Union occupying the entirety of Poland. Although the United Kingdom and France declared war on Germany soon after Germany attacked Poland, very little direct military aid was provided (see Phoney War and Western betrayal).
Following a German-staged “Polish attack” on 31 August 1939, on September 1, German forces invaded Poland from the north, south, and west. Spread thin defending their long borders, the Polish armies were soon forced to withdraw eastward. After the mid-September Polish defeat in the Battle of the Bzura, the Germans gained an undisputed advantage. Polish forces then began a withdrawal southeast, following a plan that called for a long defense in the Romanian bridgehead area, where the Polish forces were to await an expected Allied counterattack and relief.
On 17 September 1939, the Soviet Red Army invaded the eastern regions of Poland in cooperation with Germany. The Soviets were carrying out their part of the secret appendix of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, which divided Eastern Europe into Nazi and Soviet spheres of influence. Facing the second front, the Polish government decided the defense of the Romanian bridgehead was no longer feasible and ordered the evacuation of all troops to neutral Romania. By 1 October, Germany and the Soviet Union completely overran Poland, although the Polish government never surrendered. In addition, Poland’s remaining land and air forces were evacuated to neighboring Romania and Hungary. Many of the exiles subsequently joined the recreated Polish Army in allied France, French-mandated Syria, and the United Kingdom.
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Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

– Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1 April 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 9 April- 30 June 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Map of 9 April- 30 June 1945

– Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Map of 9 April- 30 June 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Map of the Invasion of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, 1945

Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

– Operations map of Iwo Jima, prepared 23 Oct 1944

Iwo Jima Maps, WW II

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Iwo Jima Maps, WW II“, posted with vodpod

 

Part of the images are used with the kind permission from the History Department at the
United States Military Academy

Additional reading : Garand, George W. and Truman R. Strobridge. History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II Volume IV: Western Pacific Operations

See also: IwoJima.com: A site dedicated to Iwo Jima and the famous battle

See also: General Maps About the Far East and the Pacific During The WW II
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The Battle of Iwo Jima (February 19, 1945 – March 26, 1945) was the United States capture of the island of Iwo Jima from Japan, producing some of the fiercest fighting in the Pacific Campaign of World War II.
The Japanese positions on the island were heavily fortified, with vast bunkers, hidden artillery, and 18 kilometers (11 mi) of tunnels.The battle was the first American attack on the Japanese Home Islands and the Imperial soldiers defended their positions tenaciously. Of the 21,000 Japanese soldiers present at the beginning of the battle, over 20,000 were killed and only 216 taken prisoner. The U.S. invasion, known as Operation Detachment, was charged with the mission of capturing the airfields on Iwo Jima.
The battle was immortalized by Joe Rosenthal’s photograph of the raising of the U.S. flag atop the 166 meter (546 ft) Mount Suribachi by five Marines and one Navy Corpsman. The photograph records the second flag-raising on the mountain, which took place on the fifth day of the 35-day battle. The picture became the iconic image of the battle and has been heavily reproduced.
Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, a photo by Joe Rosenthal – Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, a photo by Joe Rosenthal

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– Galatas, Composite Battalion, Map of 20 May
– Galatas, map of intended and actual landing areas of 3 Parachute Regiment, 20 May

– map of Georgeoupolis, 20 May
Map of Heraklion, 20 May
– Map of Kastelli, 20–26 May
– Map of the Maleme counter-attack, 21–22 May

– Maleme, 5 Brigade, 20 May
– Maleme, 22 Battalion, Map of 20 May

– Maleme, intended and actual landing areas of Assault Regiment, Map of 20 May

See also: Battle of Crete – Operation Mercury Maps (2)

See also: Battle of Crete – Movies and Propaganda

See also: Battle of Crete – Operation Mercury Maps

See also:
Full text of “Crete”, By Daniel Marcus Davin

Credits: NZ Electronic Text Centre – with the permission of the New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage, Wellington

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Collection of maps about the participation of New Zealand military forces in the Battle of Crete – from 20 May to 1 June 1941, during the Operation Mercury.

42nd Street Map, 27 May

Babali Hani Map, 28 May

Beritiana-Stilos Map, 28 May

Canea, Mao of 26 May

Canea-Galatas sector Map, 22 May

Counter-attack at Galatas Map, 25 May

Force Reserve, 27 May

Galatas, Map of 24 May

Galatas, Map of 25 May

 

See also: Battle of Crete – Movies and Propaganda

See also: Battle of Crete – Operation Mercury Maps

See also: Full text of “Crete”, By Daniel Marcus Davin

Credits: NZ Electronic Text Centre – with the permission of the New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage, Wellington.

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Imperial Powers in the Far East, 1939

Allied Strategic Concept, Map of 1943

Allied Theater Organization Map, 2 July 1942

Allied Theater Organization Map, 30 March – 6 August 1942

Map of the Areas Under Allied and Japanese Control, August 1945

Bombing of Japanese Cities Maps

China, Map of 1941 Map about the Imperial Powers in the Far East, 1939

Plans and Forces at the Beginning of the War, 1941

Plans and Forces at the Beginning of the War, December 1941

Summary of Allied Campaigns, February 1945

The Far East and the Pacific, 1941

All the images are used with the kind permission from the History Department at the United States Military Academy

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The German military genius for maneuver warfare is well illustrated by an often overlooked operation of
World War II, the invasion of Scandinavia in 1940. Operation Weserübung also warrants examination because
it was joint in execution and demonstrates that the German army, navy, and air force—Wehrmacht, Kriegsmarine,
and Luftwaffe—could fight as a team even if rivalry among the headquarters of the services made
Hitler the operation’s unified commander by fault. A combination of speed, surprise, and daring enabled the
German armed forces to defy the Royal Navy by transporting troops directly to their objectives along the
Norwegian coast. Furthermore, quickness and dash baffled the hapless Norwegians and beleaguered Allied
forces. The lessons of this operation were not lost on the British for the balance of the war and remain
relevant today as a case study in joint warfare and the operational art.

An excerpt from “Operation Weserübungnd the Origins of Joint Warfare” by  Major Richard D. Hooker, Jr., USA and Second Lieutenant Christopher Coglianese, USA.  Detailed article with maps of the campaign.

Full text of the article here: Operation Weserubung

 

Campaign In Norway, Norwegian Dispositions And Initial German Operations, 9 April 1940

 

 

 

With permission from the Department of History at the United States Military Academy

See also: The Campaign in Norway Maps – Operation Weserübung – April 9, 1940

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